2017 Abstracts Archive

Improving the Diagnosis of Gout in the Primary Care Setting
Abstract:
Gout is an inflammatory condition that has been increasing in incidence over the past several decades. For many people suffering with this form of inflammatory arthritis their first point of contact is with their Primary Care Provider (PCP). Despite existing criteria, the diagnosis of gout is often missed in the primary care setting. Using a pre-posttest research design an educational session was performed to see if a short learning lunch would increase the knowledge of the PCP. A total of 36 primary care providers participated and demonstrated a significant improvement in knowledge of the diagnostic criteria.
Students:
Emily Ragusa, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Test Name One, Junior, Test Major One
Test Name Two, Senior, Test Major
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto, Professor of Biomedical Anthropology , Biomedical Anthropology
Test Fac One, Test Title One, Test Department
Test Faculty, Test Title, Test Department


Identification of MtDNA Variants and their Effects on Climatic Adaptation
Abstract:
I am using yeast as a model to understand mito-nuclear incompatibilities between and within species and ultimately the mito-nuclear effects on various phenotypes within one species. Using S. paradoxus as our model species, my goal is to understand and determine the role that different mtDNA variants play on producing certain adaptive or maladaptive phenotypes such as climatic adaptation or the production of ROS. I am currently developing a strain set with different mito-nuclear combinations using a selective media method, but I may use an alternative method that creates auxotrophic markers via transformation for easier screening, and to overcome incompatibility issues.
Students:
Oluwashola Gbemi, Graduate, Psychology
Faculty:
Michael West , Professor, Sociology
Donald Nieman, Provost, Administration


Animal Pharm Pollution: Consequences of Agricultural Antimicrobials on Aquatic Communities
Abstract:
Anthropogenic pollutants are a widespread threat to wetland ecosystems, potentially dictating population persistence and altering ecological interactions. A contemporary challenge for ecologists is understanding the consequences of chemical contaminants at low, environmentally relevant concentrations. Antimicrobials at low concentrations have been observed in wetlands with a proximity to agriculture. These contaminants run off from livestock operations or manure amended fields into nearby waterways. Using aquatic mesocosms, we tested the effects of environmentally relevant (8 ug/L) concentrations of the antimicrobial sulfadimethoxine (SDM) on wetland communities. We found that SDM has direct impacts to producer taxa which facilitated indirect effects to consumer population densities.
Students:
Alexandra Cain, Senior, History and Political Science
Faculty:
Stephen Ortiz, Associate Professor, History


Formal Training of Relational Encoding for Insight-Driven Problem Solving
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to enhance understanding of insight-driven problem solving by examining a new method by which to encode information. The researchers predict a distinct advantage of a formal relational encoding technique over the use of a lightweight relational encoding support task.
Students:
Emily Ragusa, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto, Professor of Biomedical Anthropology , Biomedical Anthropology


Electrochemical Analysis of E.Coli in Response to External Stressors
Abstract:
We are developing a biosensor that allows rapid detection of E.Coli using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). O2 produces a characteristic peak around -0.6V on DPV graphs. We can relate the decline of oxygen over time to an increase in bacterial metabolism, and vice versa. When exposing E.Coli to external stressors such as hydrogen peroxide and bleach, which are known to kill bacteria, the oxygen peak should increase over time, due to the fact that bacteria are dying and no longer using the oxygen. This allows changes in the bacterial population to be detected in a short amount of time.
Students:
Anna Brooks, Senior, Environmental Studies/English
Faculty:
Joseph Graney, Professor of Geology , Department of Geology


Stress Management Course Improves Stress Mindset
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a stress management course on college students’ stress mindset. Stress mindset encompasses the beliefs one holds about stress. Those who view stress as beneficial have a stress-is-enhancing mindset, while those who view stress as detrimental have a stress-is-debilitating mindset. Controls enrolled in a physical activity course (n=25) and participants enrolled in the stress management course (n=24) possessed a neutral stress mindset at baseline. Students in the intervention group showed a significant shift from a neutral mindset at the beginning of the semester to a more stress-is-enhancing mindset at the end of the semester. Students in the control group did not show any significant changes in stress mindset over the course of the semester. Additionally, we analyzed the connection between personality traits and baseline stress mindset and found a significant correlation between them.
Students:
Alexandria Hammond , Senior, Biology
Adrianna Maliga , Graduate, Biochemistry
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto , Professor , Anthropology


Resource Scarcity and Monumental Architecture: Cost Signaling on Rapa Nui (Easter Island), Chile
Abstract:
Costly signaling theory (CST) explains a variety of elaborate behavioral displays as a consequence of competition over resources when the risk of direct conflict is high. Within an archaeological context, monumental architecture is potentially explained as a facet of costly signaling between individuals and groups. On Rapa Nui, CST offers an explanation for the construction of labor-intensive monuments including massive statues (moai) and ceremonial platforms (ahu). Using hypotheses derived from CST and spatial data about the distribution of archaeological features, the degree to which CST accounts for the investment in prehistoric monumental architecture on Rapu Nui is evaluated.
Students:
Sara Riedesel, Sophomore, Industrial Systems Engineering
Faculty:
Dr Michael Elmore, Director and Visiting Associate Professor, Engineering Design Division


3472559927
Abstract:
Stress can increase the incidence of anxiety and depression, in part through the Kappa Opioid Receptor (KOR). Stress-induced activation of this system may have persistent effects on neural systems that regulate anxiety in an age-dependent manner. To better understand these developmental neural adaptations, we will use repeated Forced Swim Stress and a Social Interaction test to determine behavioral changes after chronic stress in adolescents and adults. It is expected that adolescent stressed subjects will show more anxiety-like behavior than adults since the two groups process stressors differently. This may implicate age-dependent functionality of the KOR system that mediates stress-induced neural adaptations.
Students:
Andrew Genussa, Sophomore, Math
Jenn Donohue, Sophomore, Chemistry & Engineering
Faculty:
Jennifer Proper, Smart Energy Research Educator, Freshman Research Immersion
Matthew Wahila, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Physics


Marginalized Groups' Perception of Peer Acceptance in Higher Education
Abstract:
International and LGBTQ+ students make are a significant part at virtually every college or university. Despite their growing presence, they often feel left out in their home away from home. Most everyone wants to feel accepted, yet results of a 458-student survey at a mid-sized, public, northeastern university's School of Management show both groups feel less accepted and less respected by their peers than their counterparts.
Students:
Matthew Britton , Sophomore, Physics
Maggie Fox, Sophomore, Chemistry
Faculty:
Jennifer Proper, Smart Energy Research Educator, Freshman Research Immersion
Matthew Wahila, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Physics


The Effects of Creative Self-Efficacy and Cross-Application of Experiences on Risk-Taking At Work
Abstract:
While risk-taking can be dangerous in certain organizational settings, it is becoming increasingly important for organizations with a creativity requirement. This study examines two factors that potentially relate to risk-taking at work, creative self-efficacy and cross-application of experiences. Results suggest that both constructs are positively related to risk-taking at work.
Students:
Miriam Wade, Senior, Arabic, Judaic Studies, MENA
Faculty:
Jonathan Karp, Professor, Judaic Studies


The Varying Perceptions of Diversity Amongst Races Throughout College Years
Abstract:
The physical diversity of colleges and universities in the United States has been thoroughly examined and statistically measured, but studies students’ perception and knowledge of diversity is not commonly investigated (Clauss-Ehlers & Parham, 2014; Hammond, 2016). Therefore, the goal of this study is to explore the relationship between students’ knowledge/perception of diversity on their campus with their year in college. Results suggest a positive relationship between students’ knowledge of diversity and their years in college.
Students:
Lindy Chiu, Senior, BA in Biological Sciences and Studio Arts
Ashley Paynter, Senior, BS in Biological Sciences EEB
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto, Research Professor of Biomedical Anthropology, Anthropology


Nanofibrous Polymer and Metal Organic Framework Composites for the Degradation of Simulated Chemical Warfare Agents
Abstract:
There is a great need for materials able to quickly decontaminate chemical warfare agents, specifically nerve agents, for which methyl paraoxon is a simulant. Polymer composite nanofibers consisting of the precursors to titanium dioxide and the metal organic framework UiO-66 possess catalytic properties when introduced to methyl paraoxon. The reaction must be performed in a pH 10 buffer solution to see its effects. This study aims to allow for the degradation of methyl paraoxon at a neutral pH by incorporating base into the polymer composite nanofibers. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to track the degradation process.
Students:
Meghan Bell, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Ming An, Associate Professor, Chemistry


Eigenvalue Problems of PDEs using Numerical Methods
Abstract:
Spectral methods offer a much more efficient way of solving eigenvalue problems than conventional computational methods. This research focused on applying spectral methods to solve eigenvalue problems in new ways, such as those of vibrating plates. Various Matlab programs were tested and modified in attempts to create eigenvalue patterns for plates, such as the Chladni Figures. ANSYS was also used as another method of testing eigenvalue patterns. A strong connection was made between the spectral methods and ANSYS results of a free plate, but a program that calculated the eigenvalue patterns of a clamped plate proved too difficult to write.
Students:
Laila Kassis, Senior, Political Science & Sociology
Faculty:
David Cingranelli, Professor, Political Science


The Effect of Gender on Changes in Activity Levels During Motivation Educational Speech-Based Events
Abstract:
Inspirational and informative speakers aim to elicit positive changes in the minds of their audience. Research on how these speakers affect their audiences,however, has been anecdotal. This study tested the emotional responses subjects have to motivational, educational speech-based events by surveying several emotion levels before and after the event.
Students:
Karen Lin, Senior, Nursing
Faculty:
Ann Fronczek, Faculty adviser, Nursing


Diversity Exemplars and Race: Their influence on Perceptions of Career Preparedness
Abstract:
Diversity is a pressing matter for organizations and students are watching how companies value diversity. This research project looks into the relationship between diversity in a mid-sized public university students, their exposure to company exemplars, and their self-perceived career preparedness. After controlling for year, gender, GPA, and proactivity to attend voluntary professionalism events, results showed that Caucasian students’ perceptions of their own individual career support were higher than non-Caucasian students. In addition, regardless of race, data results showed that the more students were exposed to examples of companies that valued diversity, the higher they ranked their individual career preparedness.
Students:
Liang Liu, Graduate, Mechanical Engineering
Faculty:
Timothy Singler, Professor, Mechanical Engineering


Assessing the Impact and Importance of Public Satisfaction Surveys of Local Government Services
Abstract:
Resident satisfaction surveys of local government services are often seen as the standard method of assessing the performance and impact of services on the public. However, the literature is mixed on the effectiveness of using surveys for assessing service provision. Comparing different municipalities for their uses of public surveys, as well as assessments of road conditions that occurred at approximately the same time, satisfaction surveys for government services, specifically road maintenance, are tested for their accuracy in determining the accuracy of service impact.
Students:
Brianna Infante, Junior, Psychology
Melissa Keller, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Erin Washburn, Assistant Professor of Literacy Education, Graduate School of Education


Restoring invaded ecosystems: Does invasive species management increase native diversity?
Abstract:
Invasive species are known to impact native species’ diversity; however, their removal does not always allow for recovery. Understanding the effects following the removal of invasive species is critical for ecosystem restoration. We conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis of published studies that measured changes in species diversity pre and post removal of invasive species. Using this data, we will determine how often management allows for gains in native species diversity, and if certain contexts allow for recovery. Assessing the outcome of invasive species management is useful for determining if their effects on ecosystems are reversible.
Students:
Jermel, Sophomore, McClure
Faculty:
Jason Moore, Professor, Sociology


Dormancy Survival Skills: The Role of Metabolic Suppression in Adaptation to Climate Change
Abstract:
Altered phenology is expected to be a major effect of climate change for ecological communities. Phenology in insects is often controlled by diapause which is a seasonally developmental arrest that allows insects to mitigate unfavorable environmental changes. We will use a model system for evolution-in-action and seasonal adaptation to better understand the role of metabolic suppression and energetics in phenological adaptation. In this study, we use stop-flow respirometry to test how multiple bouts of cooling and warming at the end of winter effect the metabolic trajectories of insects in diapause.
Students:
Robert Champion, Graduate, Biomedical Anthropology
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto, Dr., Anthropology


Density and infectivity of Ixodes scapularis with Borrelia burgdorferi and the human risk of Lyme disease in the Upper Susquehanna River Basin
Abstract:
Human cases of Lyme disease continue to rise in the Upper Susquehanna River Basin, as more people are getting infected with B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme, through the bite of an infected blacklegged tick. This project determines density and infectivity of blacklegged ticks with B. burgdorferi to understand human risk of infection. Ticks were collected along pathways of high human use within recreational parks parks in 6 counties from May- August of 2015 and 2016. Results show an overall infectivity rate of 34.3% in ticks, suggesting that public parks may pose a high risk for disease transmission to humans.
Students:
Chenelle Seck, Sophomore, Sociology
Faculty:
Diana Gildea, Professor, Geography
Kelvin Santiago-Valles, Professor, Sociology


A study of inter-letter spacing during visual word recognition
Abstract:
Spacing apart letters within words (e.g., WORD vs. W O R D) helps individuals read faster and with fewer errors. Here, we investigate how letter spacing impacts the processing of different types of stimuli. To examine this, we recorded reaction times and accuracy during an immediate repetition detection task while participants viewed words, psuedowords (i.e. VORP), illegal letter strings (i.e. XLVF), and a false font. Stimuli were presented in three levels of interletter spacing (crowded, standard, and spaced). Results are discussed in terms of how interletter spacing affects the processing of different stimuli, and possible neural correlates.
Students:
Sarah Marcus, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Anthony Fiumera, Associate professor, Biology


Creative Catalyst Identity, Rewards, and Being a Peer Creative Catalyst
Abstract:
Many studies have been done about inspiring creativity in the workplace, yet little is known about influencing employees to act as creative catalysts to their peers. Answers from a survey within field study of an American engine company were analyzed to display the relationships between Rewards for Creativity and a Peer Catalyst, as well as the relationship between Catalyst Identity and a Peer Catalyst. This study suggests that that rewards for creativity are not related to inspiring creativity in a peer but one’s identity as a creative catalyst is.
Students:
Caroline Sendek, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Peter Gerhardstein, Dr. , Psychology


Differences in Gene Expression between Fly Lines Exposed to Atrazine
Abstract:
Atrazine is one of the most widely used herbicides in the United States and is known to have negative effects on non-target organisms. Using ecologically relevant doses, we show that atrazine exposure accelerates development time in wildtype Drosophila melanogaster and demonstrate that there is genetic variation for this response within 100 DGRP lines. Using a GWAS we find 19 genes in males that associate with susceptibility to atrazine and 18 in females. Here we test seven of those genes using qRT-PCR to determine if there is differential gene expression between DGRP lines that are most susceptible and most resistant.
Students:
Lisa Wadolowski, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Peter Gerhardstein, Professor, Psychology


5856831510
Abstract:
In this modern age of organic synthesis, there is a significant emphasis placed on conducting reactions without using metals and other environmentally toxic reagents. Organocatalysis is the branch of organic synthesis that accomplished this goal by using environmentally benign organic molecules as catalysts to replace these toxic metals as catalysts in organic reactions. This is a fast-developing area of research; however there is limited information available to chemists about how these reactions work. My research focused on the mechanistic study of one particular organocatalytic reaction – the organocatalytic hydroamination reaction of alkenes. The hydroamination reaction is a powerful transformation that converts cheaply available starting materials such as alkenes to high value pharmaceutical compounds containing a carbon-nitrogen bond. As the name suggests this is accomplished by adding a hydrogen atom (hydro) and an amine (amination) to the two ends of a carbon-carbon double bond. Virtually all existing methods for this transformation involves transition metal catalysts. Recently, the Vetticatt group discovered that this reaction can, in fact, be catalyzed by a simple organic molecule such as acetic acid
Students:
Benjamin Seitz, Junior, Psychology
Cody Polack, Graduate, Psychology
Faculty:
Ralph R Miller, Distinguished Professor, Psychology


Thinking about conservation targets: Recovery of complex versus simple ecological systems from invasive species management
Abstract:
Invasive species are often the target of conservation efforts with management attempting to restore invaded ecosystems to their natural states. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies which measured ecological responses to invasive species removal compared to when they were present. We calculated mean effect sizes for several types of ecological responses for different conservation targets (e.g., populations, communities or ecosystems). We seek to examine if invasive species management allows for conservation gains for different conservation targets.This knowledge is important for future conservation efforts to determine the efficacy of invasive species removal.
Students:
Deanna Keenan, Senior, Psychology and Africana Studies
Mmekom Udosen, Sophomore, Integrative Neuroscience and Africana Studies
Melissa Chacko, Junior, Biological Anthropology
Gabrielle Schiller, Senior, History
Helen Frazer, Junior, Biological Anthropology
Dailyn Aquino, Junior, Biochemistry
Faculty:
Titilayo Okoror, Professor, Africana Studies


The Effect of Diverse Role Models on Students Feelings of Inclusivity
Abstract:
Today, diversity is a common goal among many college campuses. Diversity has been shown to have many positive effects on a learning environment. One of these positive effects is a more open dynamic between students and staff. A survey was conducted at a mid-sized public university that included 458 students. The results of this survey were then analyzed to determine the effect that a diverse staff had on students and how they were valued by faculty.
Students:
Anita Raychawdhuri, Senior, English
Faculty:
Barrett Bowlin, Lecturer , English


Adaptive Memory: Is There a Reproduction Processing Effect?
Abstract:
Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007) demonstrated that processing words based on their relevancy to one’s survival yields enhanced retention, known as Survival Processing. Though the proximate mechanisms are unclear, one ultimate explanation is that our cognitive abilities evolved to be fitness relevant. We postulated if there is a survival processing benefit, there should also be a reproduction related benefit. We repeatedly failed to find a Mating Processing benefit, but did observe a Parent Processing benefit that seems to be specific to one’s own biological children and does not appear to extend to the raising of an adopted child or pet.
Students:
Robert Huang, Senior, Biology
Faculty:
Anthony Fiumera, Doctor, Biology


Two- Phase Outcome Interference by Neutral and Affective Outcomes
Abstract:
Extinction and Counterconditioning are two procedures that can undermine the previously learned relation between two events. In three experiments with human subjects, we examined the effects of associating different outcomes with the same cue. Extinction involves one event occurring in the absence of the other after the two have regularly co-occurred. In counterconditioning, a novel event is presented in addition to the absence of one event. Counterconditioning is typically more effective than extinction; however, our experiments have observed that The participants all saw the pairing of cue 1 with outcome 1 and depending on the condition saw either the same outcome, different outcome or not outcome at all. Ccounterconditioning is reliably less effective than was significantly attenuated from the no decrement condition, but also much less than the extinction condition. In a number of experiments, we have explored whether the outcome must have affective value for counterconditioning to be effective and whether participants fail to detect the change in outcomes.
Students:
Sara Hobler, Sophomore, History/Socioloy
Faculty:
Sidney Dement, Professor, Russian


Learning your ABCDs: Asset-Based Community Development, International Service Learning, and Community Engaged Research in Rural Malawi
Abstract:
The partnership between BU and the Malawi Children’s Mission (MCM) aims to (1) develop sustainable income-generating activities in rural Malawi, (2) gather data that informs the work and generates knowledge for small-scale community development, and (3) provide meaningful international service learning opportunities for university students. Working collaboratively with the staff from MCM, we conducted interviews with members of the M’bwana, Jamali, and Mwazama communities (n=35), meetings with the village chiefs and sub-chiefs (n=10), and large community meetings (n=350) to learn how community members and leaders envision the future and what they want in terms of support to achieve their vision.
Students:
Benny Mei, Senior, Computer Science / Mathematical Sciences
Faculty:
Pavel Masek, Assistant Professor, Biology


Apprenticeship in Collaborative Piano with Dr. Joel Harder
Abstract:
For my Summer Scholars and Artists Project, I undertook an apprenticeship with my mentor and collaborative piano professor, Dr. Joel Harder. The main focus of my project was to learn Robert Schumann’s Dichterliebe, one of his most famous song cycles that was written during the Romantic period of classical music. We spent eight weeks having lessons twice a week, which allowed us to hone in on learning and applying collaborative skills to the Dichterliebe. Not only did we focus on technical skills such as rhythm and harmony, but we focused on style and feeling, which is what makes a musical performance whole and incredible. The final performance took place in October 2016 with two MM opera students and was very successful. With this project I was able to further my study of collaborative piano and was able to develop important skills to help me with further graduate studies.
Students:
Laila Kassis, Senior, Political Science & Sociology
Faculty:
David Cingranelli, Professor, Political Science


Mating System Plasticity in Mimulus
Abstract:
Transitions in phenotypic plasticity (ability to exhibit different phenotypes in different environments) may contribute to evolution. Loss of plasticity in a reproductive trait can isolate a derived specialist from its progenitor. We study two sister species: Mimulus floribundus, a granite generalist with a mixed mating system (outcrossing and selfing) and M. norrisii, a limestone specialist that by-and-large selfs. We predict that raising M. floribundus in limestone soil will induce a greater-selfing phenotype with closer male and female reproductive parts. Transition from a mixed to selfing system may explain the development of the limestone specialist, M. norrisii from a floribundus-like ancestor.
Students:
Julia Townsend, Sophomore, biochemistry
Abu Rahat, Sophomore, biology
Michael Goldberg, Sophomore, neuroscience
Faculty:
Ralph Garruto, Doctor, Biomedical Anthropology
Amanda Roome , ., Biomedical Anthropology


Effects of Dietary Intake on Iron Deficiency in Children in Rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Abstract:
Objective was to determine the relationship between iron deficiency and dietary intake among children in rural Kilimanjaro. It is not clear if inadequate iron absorption or iron loss from infectious diseases causes iron deficiency in east Africa. We characterized diets using 3 sequential 24-hour interviews. Biomarkers TFR and hemoglobin characterized iron stress and anemia. Contrary to expectations, average daily iron intake was unassociated with iron status. Tea and porridge were positively associated with TFR (ß =1.06, P=.013), (ß =.8, P=.158), respectively. These results indicate iron inhibitors, tea and porridge are associated with iron stress while dietary iron intake is not.
Students:
Melissa Conti, Graduate, Psychology
Ariel Marantz, Senior, Psychology
Erica Roth, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Ann Merriwether, Professor, Psychology


Diversity Training in Academia: The Influences of Subgroups' Perceptions and Their Role in Diversity Appreciation
Abstract:
Diversity training has long been part of organizations’ training and development efforts, but diversity training in academia has received less attention. Survey results indicate that students of different majors and race perceive diversity training differently, and that diversity training mediates the relationship between those variables and diversity appreciation.
Students:
Dana Kinel, Sophomore, Environmental Studies; PPL
Faculty:
Diana Gildea, Professor , Geography


The Union of Public Art and Nationalism in Madrid and Barcelona
Abstract:
This project explores perceived distinctions observed between Madrid and Barcelona. One of the ways in which the cities differed was through public artistic expression. While Madrid stressed the quintessential parts of the Spanish identity, Barcelona cultivated a less traditional and more community based identity. In order to delve into the differences and give context to the art, the historical and cultural backgrounds of each city were examined. Eventually, the questioned that emerged was, how is public art in Madrid and Barcelona a reflection of each city’s interpretation of Spanish nationalism?
Students:
Elin G Mina, Graduate, Biological Science
Faculty:
Claudia NH Marques, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences


Parametric Resonance in a Repulsive-Force MEMS Actuator
Abstract:
Parametric resonances in a repulsive-force MEMS cantilever are investigated. The repulsive force is generated through electrostatic fringe fields arising from a specific electrode configuration. Because of the nature of the electrostatic force, parametric resonance occurs and can be predicted with Mathieu's Equation. Governing equations of motion are solved with the shooting method and show both parametric and subharmonic resonance. Dynamic testing has been performed on fabricated repulsive-force cantilevers, which exhibited parametric resonance as predicted by the model. This is of particular interest for MEMS sensors that require large signal-to-noise ratios because of the large oscillation amplitude associated with parametric resonance.
Students:
Raneem Kurzum, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Richard Mattson, Associate Professor of Psychology, Psychology


Where the Wetlands End: An Art Exhibition
Abstract:
Conveying scientific research to a large audience is integral to scientists’ work. Our theory is that artwork is effective for improving public awareness of scientific material. We are creating an interactive art exhibit to test this theory. “Where the Wetlands End” focuses on the effects of road salts, antibiotics, and pesticides on wetland systems. This exhibit will feature digital art, paintings, sculptures, and live specimens. An optional survey will ask patrons about their background and their impression of scientific research before and after viewing the exhibition. This study seeks to confirm previous findings by Dr. Jessica Hua's ecology lab.
Students:
Sarah Glose, Graduate, Public Administration
Faculty:
George Homsy, Assistant Professor, Public Administration


Cognitive Reappraisal and Reactivity to Interpersonal Stress
Abstract:
Elevated emotional and physiological responses to stress can be risk factors for Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. Emotion regulation strategies such as cognitive reappraisal, have been used along with long term therapeutic and pharmaceutical treatments. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether cognitive reappraisal can be used as an immediate coping strategy in response to acute interpersonal stress, and whether current depressive and anxiety symptoms influence the efficacy of cognitive reappraisal on emotion modulation.
Students:
Alexandra Kugler, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Peter Gerhardstein , Dr., Psychology


BLACKLEGGED TICK DENSITY AND INFECTIVITY WITH BORRELIA BURGDORFERI AND HUMAN RISK BEHAVIORS IN BROOME COUNTY PARKS
Abstract:
Lyme disease is a growing health concern in the Northeastern United States. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected Ixodes scapularis tick. Ticks were collected via dragging and infectivity was determined through molecular laboratory analysis. Human risk events were determined through direct observation. In Broome County parks, tick densities ranged from 0.9- 2.1/1000m2 and tick infectivity ranged from 22-42%. Preliminary data suggests that nearly half of all people have a clothing or behavioral risk. These data suggest that parks may serve as high risk areas for Lyme transmission.
Students:
Arianna Caradonna, Sophomore, Biology
Faculty:
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Dr., Decker School of Nursing
Rick Kauffman, Dr., Biology


Flowing DNA Through Carbon Nanotubes
Abstract:
Biological cells often regulate cell activity by passing molecules through the pores of their membranes. Such transport can be modeled by using electric fields to flow DNA through fluidic structures. This phenomena, however, is not well understood. The goal of our project is to use carbon nanotubes, rolled up sheets of graphene, as fluidic channels to investigate how the rate of DNA transport is affected by applied voltage, DNA length, and ionic concentration. We are currently fabricating fluidic structures with carbon nanotubes embedded within them. Understanding the transport of DNA through carbon nanotubes could be a step toward sequencing DNA.
Students:
Hoang, Senior, Ta
Faculty:
Pong-Yu, Huang, Mechanical Engineering


Impact of the arts on public perception, comprehension, and retention of scientific research
Abstract:
We created an interactive art exhibit based on two papers to test if art improved comprehension, perception, and retention of scientific concepts. Patrons described their perception before and after visiting the exhibit in surveys, and we quizzed ecology students on whether art helped them comprehend and retain scientific findings. Our data showed a 20% perception increase in non-scientifically oriented participants with only a 10% increase in scientifically oriented people; ecology students saw no change in perception and scored highest when reading abstracts. This suggests that art can facilitate scientific appreciation and is most influential for individuals with non-scientific backgrounds.
Students:
Shai Lev, Junior, Nursing
Cassandra Flanagan, Sophomore, Nursing
Sydney Landsman, Senior, Psychology
Caroline Keenan, Junior, Nursing
Anna Schor, Senior, Psychology
Alana Heyman, Junior, Harpur
Holly Russell, Junior, Nursing
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Fran Srnka-Debnar, Clinical Associate Professor, Decker School of Nursing


Assessing the role of dietary factors and intestinal inflammation on gut permeability
Abstract:
The incidence of diseases (such as Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome), associated with disruption of intestinal barrier function, is expanding on a similar trajectory as industrial food additive consumption. This study aims to test the effects of three of such additives, nanoparticles (TiO2), gluten and glucose, along with the effects of inflammation, mimicked using tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), on the permeability across an in vitro gut model. The cell permeability was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER) and Lucifer Yellow (LY) rejection. The results showed a significant change in the membrane integrity of the gut upon exposure to TNFα, TiO2, and glucose.
Students:
Emily Fleischman, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Christof Grewer, Dr., Biophysical Chemistry


Biochemical and physiological analyses of Drosophila fat body and heart during caloric overload
Abstract:
Caloric excess is linked to metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesize that caloric excess causes lipids in Drosophila fat body to reach a maximum storage limit, resulting in accumulation of toxic lipids (lipotoxicity) in other tissues, namely the heart. Triglycerides decrease when Stearoyl-CoA-desaturase-1 is knocked down in fat body. Assays of heart function, exercise tolerance, and lipid mass spectrometry will allow us to identify metabolic pathways that contribute to lipotoxicity and also lipotoxins that contribute to metabolic syndrome. The goal is to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms and targets involved in metabolic disease.
Students:
Nikki Naim, Senior, Biochemistry
Faculty:
Jeffery Schertzer, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences


Harnessing quantum slaves sheds new light on old mystery material
Abstract:
Quantum materials have an inherent complexity born from correlations. Currently, our ability to predict the properties of these systems is limited by computational cost and basic understanding. We are addressing these issues with a technique using slave spins. By fracturing the electronic degrees of freedom, we can capture purely quantum phenomena. Our application of the slave-spin method to a curious material known for 50 years is yielding new insights into the physics of correlated electrons. In a world of interconnected webs of information, untangling correlated systems can enhance our understanding of things like internet protocols, ecosystems, and human brains.
Students:
Samantha Fradkin, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Max Owens , Postdoctoral Fellow , Psychology
Brandon Gibb, Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training , Psychology


Cyclic effects of progesterone on brain activity related to alcohol in adolescent human females
Abstract:
The goal of this work was to examine the relationship between substance use, progesterone cycling, and brain responses to alcoholic stimuli. We examined how progesterone and brain responses to alcoholic stimuli were related to adolescents’ reported substance use. We collected the electroencephalogram (EEG) while participants viewed images of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Progesterone was sampled from saliva, and participants visited the lab in two sessions spaced two weeks apart in order to examine potential cyclic interactions between progesterone and brain-activity related to alcohol. Progesterone levels and brain responses to alcohol were used to try to predict participants’ substance use levels.
Students:
Minyoung Kim, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Claudia Marques, Assistant Professor, Biology


Genes affecting susceptibility to paraquat in D. melanogaster
Abstract:
Paraquat is a commonly used herbicide that increases oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster and other non-target organisms, leading to dopaminergic cell death and loss of motor ability. Genetic variation in susceptibility to paraquat was quantified by testing 100 DGRP lines for climbing ability. This information was then used in a GWAS to identify the 31 and 14 genes in females and males respectively that are involved in paraquat susceptibility. Associated genes were verified using RNAi knockdowns in whole bodies and specific organs and by measuring gene expression with qrt-PCR.
Students:
Tara McElroy, Senior, Biology
Zaid Tayyem, Senior, Biology
Mohammed Hasan, Senior, Biology
Torah Scheininger, Junior, Biology
Samantha Bangug, Junior, Biology
Alexa Hartmyer, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Kathleen Horwath, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences


Dietary Supplement Knowledge and Usage Among College Students
Abstract:
Dietary supplements (DS) are ingestible products containing ingredient(s) intended to add extra nutritional value to the diet. This study assessed DS knowledge, perceptions, and usage among students at Binghamton University. The protocol was approved by Binghamton University's IRB. Students (N = 289) took survey consisting of demographics, supplements taken, motivations for use, supplement knowledge, and lifestyle choices. Eighty percent of participants used DS in the last year, with multivitamins ranking highest. Supplement use appears to be higher in the college subpopulation than in the general U.S. population. DS education should be emphasized on college campuses to promote healthy, informed consumption.
Students:
Elizabeth Kisty, Sophomore, Nursing
Julia Jozefowski, Junior, Nursing
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Fran Srnka-Debnar, Clinical Associate Professor, Decker School of Nursing


Researching and Creating a Kunstmärchen
Abstract:
This poster will summarize the process and results of my SSAP project. The goal of my project was to create a kunstmärchen, or “art tale”, based on my research of the Norwegian “folk” and folklore. In a way, it was an experiment of combining my academic pursuits in Anthropology with my creative interests in art and storytelling. The poster will follow my process of researching, writing, and drawing, while illuminating some of the challenges faced along the way. On my laptop, I will display a gallery of reference images and concept art for this project.
Students:
Danielle Nigro, Graduate, Theatre
Faculty:
Anne Brady, Professor, Theatre


The search for alternative battery materials
Abstract:
In search of an alternative to expensive Li ion batteries, multivalent ion battery sources are investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the Chevrel phase cathode materials Mo6X8 (X=S,Se,Te), with various metal ions (M=Li,Na,Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba,Al) intercalated into the cathode material. Ca ions produce a voltage of 1.2 V, similar to the voltage for Li ions. The highest voltage is obtained when the cathode material is composed of S atoms Mo6S8. Different density functionals will be tested to identify the ones that best reproduce experimental values.
Students:
Jenny Guan, Junior, Nursing
Ashley Oddo, Junior, Nursing
Valois Feneziani, Junior, Nursing
Melanie Hernan, Junior, Nursing
Katherin Festa, Junior, Nursing
Annalisa Samaroo, Senior, Nursing
Emily Blunnie, Sophomore, Harpur
JuHee Yoo, Senior, Nursing
Lillian Ruan, Senior, Biological Sciences
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Fran Srnka-DebnarC, Clinical Associate Professor, Decker School of Nursing


Identity, Cultural Beliefs about Education and Health Among Asians Students on Binghamton University Campus
Abstract:
This study explored how identity and cultural beliefs about education affects perceptions about health among Asians students. As part of a class project, participants were recruited through investigators’ social networks. Ten consenting students, with ages from 19 to 23 years, participated in focus groups and interviews that were audiotaped. Using content analysis, three themes emerged: Self-identity, Others’ Perception of identity, and Family Expectations about Education. This research suggests that Asian students may be experiencing stress as a result of racial stereotypes due to their skin color, pressure from their family to perform well in school, and expectations about the future.
Students:
Elana Schlossberg, Graduate, Public Administration
Faculty:
George Homsy, Assistant Professor/Capstone Advisor, Public Administration


Dopamine and Acetylcholine Lesion Model Reflects Parkinson's Disease Symptoms and L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia
Abstract:
Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes symptoms such as akinesia. PD is typically associated with nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion, but has recently been associated with cognitive deficits from basal forebrain (BF) acetylcholine (ACh) loss. L-DOPA, the gold-standard treatment for PD motor deficits, can lead to L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), or uncontrollable hyperkinetic movements, and does not alleviate cognitive symptoms. This study compared a unilateral DA+ACh-lesion model to a traditional DA-lesion model and found that motor and cognitive performance on various behavioral tests is unaffected by BF-ACh loss. It also appears LID is attenuated by ACh-lesion systems.
Students:
Jacqueline Clark, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Carol Miles, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences


Fat Girls Have Just As Much Fun; Internalization of Social Appearance Standards and Body Appreciation’s Effects on the Relationship between Body-Mass-Index and Sexual Satisfaction
Abstract:
This experiment examined the relationship between body-mass-index (BMI) and sexual satisfaction. It was hypothesized that body appreciation would mediate the relationship between BMI and sexual satisfaction. It was also hypothesized that rejection of internalizing sociocultural appearance standards would moderate the relationship between BMI and body appreciation. 110 college females participated in a questionnaire. The results did not support the hypotheses. However, rejection of sociocultural appearance standards and body application were separately shown to moderate the relationship between BMI and sexual satisfaction. These findings suggest that women with high body appreciation tend to have more sexual satisfaction despite their current weight.
Students:
Shelby Hochberg, Senior, Psychology
Rachael Shaw, Junior, Psychology
Loretta O'Brien, Senior, Psychology
Alexandra Pappacena, Junior, Psychology
Alejandra Sanchez, Junior, Psychology
Faculty:
Donald Levis, Professor of Psychology, Psychology
Patricia Rourke, PhD, Counseling Center
Paul Knowlton, Graduate Student, Psychology


Mitochondrial Epistasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Abstract:
Genetic variation in mtDNAs contributes to complex trait phenotypes. Because mtDNA is typically inherited as a single unit, it is difficult to assess whether phenotypic differences are due to single/additive gene effects from the mtDNAs, or interactions between mitochondrial genes. I am using yeast, where mtDNAs recombine during matings, to create a yeast collection that share the same nuclear DNA and unique recombinant mtDNAs. Comparing phenotypic differences in strains should help to determine if additive and mitochondrial gene interactions explain mtDNA phenotypes. This work will help determine evolutionary trajectories for mtDNA and potentially help to explain heritability of complex traits.
Students:
Crystal Tasber, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Sharon Bossert, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Christopher Bishop, Professor and Chair, Psychology


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Abstract:
Queering Social Dating Apps: Do You Swipe Both Ways? This project is focused on how sexual orientation influences the usage of social dating applications. Differences in application usage was found between exclusively heterosexual participants and non-exclusively heterosexual participants. Application usage is observed in relation to intention and active agency by the participant. The project examined whether advanced planning using apps predicted greater hook-up satisfaction. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to Sexual Script Theory (/////) and queer hookup culture on college campuses.
Students:
Roseann Biju Puthiyamadam, Sophomore, Human Development
Faculty:
Diana C Gildea , Visiting Lecturer, Geography
Ann Merriwether , Doctor , Psychology


Unscripted Sexuality: Are Straight Women Missing the Boat?
Abstract:
Studies of women’s sexuality are typically approached using a narrow three-category system of sexual orientation identity (heterosexual, homosexual and bisexual). The current study allows for more sexual fluidity using the Fritz-Klein Matrix (1987). Women who varied in sexual orientation were surveyed on recent hookup experiences and attitudes about casual sex. We hypothesized that non-exclusively heterosexual women would be more assertive during sexual encounters and have a more sex-positive view than exclusively heterosexual women. Results are discussed in relation to differences in sexual scripts and gender role attitudes.
Students:
Zachary Lowy, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Melissa Levine, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Peter Gerhardstein, Dr., Psychology


“But is it Facebook Official?” How College Students Define Dating
Abstract:
The term “dating” is often thought of today as “a vehicle whereby two individuals can come together to interact and to find out more about one another (Christopher, F.S., & Frandsen, M.M., (1990).” The term “dating” is utilized by college students frequently to describe their relationships; however, there is no consensus as to what the definition truly is. A sample of college students were surveyed and asked: “What does dating mean today?” There were a range of responses and some patterns emerged as well as a variety of individual differences. Results were interpreted using Sexual Script Theory (Jones, Hoslter, 2002).
Students:
Tatiana Requijo, Junior, B.S. Cell and Molecular Biology
Faculty:
Dr Laura Musselman, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences


Finding Tinderella : How Digital Communication Impacts Sexual Satisfaction
Abstract:
Little research exists regarding how the use of social media and hookup applications impact communication and satisfaction for college student hookups. The current study hypothesized that communication between partners prior to hookups would lead to greater sexual satisfaction post - hookup. Results indicated that prior communication had a positive impact on hookup sexual satisfaction. Results are discussed in relation to gender roles and sexual script theory.
Students:
Lin Qiang Wang, Senior, Bioengineering
Faculty:
Bonggu Shim, Assistant Professor, Physics


Socio-cultural context and Sexual Identity among LGBTQIAP on Binghamton University Campus
Abstract:
We examined how socio-cultural influences shape LGBTQIAP students’ health and self-sexual identity on Binghamton University campus. As part of a class project, participants were recruited through investigators’ social networks. Ten consenting students, with ages from 18 to 22 years, participated in focus groups and interviews that were audiotaped. Using content analysis, four themes emerged: growing up in American culture versus non-American culture, reluctance to associate mental illness with sexual identity, “coming out” relieves stress, and not associating sexual identity to overall identity in self-description. Our research suggests that campus can be a safe space for those within the LBGTQIAP community.
Students:
Jowell Padro, Senior, Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Faculty:
Aja Martinez, Professor, English


Flavor in Fruit Flies
Abstract:
Gustatory perception is crucial for determining the palatability or toxicity of food before it is ingested. However, taste is not the only modality responsible for food evaluation. The multi-modal assessment of food properties is generally called ‘flavor’. We use Drosophila melanogaster to study the interaction of various sensory stimuli on feeding and food preference. To measure taste assessment and feeding events, we use single fly feeding assay, Fly Liquid Interactive Counter (FLIC). In humans, about 80% of flavor is comprised of olfactory perception. Therefore, we first seek to measure the modulation of feeding caused by the presence of olfactory cues.
Students:
Christopher Coogan, Senior, Biomedical Engineering
Faculty:
Seokheun Choi, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering


Knowledge and Awareness Level about Hepatitis-B Virus in the Central Region of Ghana, West Africa
Abstract:
There is limited research on the knowledge and awareness level of Hepatitis-B (HBV) among rural dwellers in the central region of Ghana. This study assessed the knowledge level among patients who came for health services at a free clinic. 216 consenting participants completed an 8-item knowledge survey about HBV. Participants were mostly female (71%), and married (60%) with children (83%). While most participants reported that they have heard of HBV (75%), many reported not knowing the cause of the disease (87%). Average number of correct answers on the knowledge test was 4.38. There is need for health education about HBV. 
Students:
Emma Lecarie, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Brandon Gibb, Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training, Psychology


On the Privatization of a Nation: The Case for Binghamton University
Abstract:
This research looks at the ways that Binghamton University parallels the broader privatization of public higher education throughout the United States. It explores 1) how Binghamton University has adopted privatized ideologies and what those ramifications are and 2) whether the privatization of education is a detriment to society as a whole. My focus is on the late 20th century to present day examining the fluctuations in the economy, politics and social opinion, all of which are fundamental to understanding the motives behind different approaches by administrators and politicians to orient Binghamton University in a more successful direction.
Students:
Pamela Lovejoy, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Anthony Fiumera, Associate Professor, Biology


“I don’t really fit the norm” – Health and Perceived Racism/Discrimination Among Black Students on Binghamton University Campus
Abstract:
This study explored how perceived racism and discrimination may affect the health of Black students on Binghamton University campus. As part of a class project, participants were recruited through student groups with large Black student populations and social networks. Fourteen consenting students, aged 18 to 24 years, participated in interviews and focus groups that were audiotaped. Using content analysis, four themes emerged: boxed into one racial definition; feeling disconnected; lack of POC representation; and gendered mental health and masculinity. This research suggests that black students may be experiencing stress due to racial stereotypes about their skin color and social pressures.
Students:
Shahrokh Akhlaghi, Graduate, Power System Dynamic
Faculty:
Ning Zhou, Dr, ECE


Oops, I Did It Again: Gender Differences Among Sexual Regret in College Students
Abstract:
This study surveys college-student hook-up behavior and attitudes about casual sex. In addition, participants were asked if they regretted their most recent hook-up and why. We hypothesized that men and women would experience sexual regret differently. Two theories that examine gender differences in casual sex attitudes are sexual selection theory, which is grounded in Darwinian notions of intra-species competition, and sexual script theory, which centers around differing societal expectations for men and women. These theories were compared and used to explain the differences found in this study.
Students:
Test Student, Sophomore, Sophomore
Test Student Two, Junior, Junior
Faculty:
Test Faculty, Test Title, Test Department


Musical Theatre Trip to China
Abstract:
This past summer I travelled to China to study the stylistic differences between American and Chinese Musical Theatre with the Open Door Theatre Company, a program through Carthage College in Wisconsin. Over the course of three weeks, I performed two pieces of musical theatre at different Chinese academies and universities across Shanghai, Xian, and Beijing, while at the same time immersing myself in the art and culture of China. Additionally, I learned what it is like to be on a professional tour with a theatre company and I furthered my learning of performance techniques in musical theatre.
Students:
Afix Famosa, Graduate, DNP
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, PHD, Decker School of Nursing


Fabrication Methods and Variations on Copper (I) Iodide
Abstract:
Society is calling for smarter devices and energy generating technologies that are comprised of earth abundant materials, cheap to produce, and efficient. Copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are a transparent, semiconducting material being researched for applications in photovoltaics and transparent electronics. The transparency and conductivity of CuI thin films were investigated. Thin films of CuI were fabricated via vapor deposition and spin coating a solution of CuI, resulting in thin films. CuI thin films are more transparent (>80% transmittance) and more resistive, with an average conductivity of 7.4 S/cm, than some other transparent conductive materials reported.
Students:
Yonaida Valentine, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Melanie Ragin, Research Advisor, McNair Scholar's Program


Religion as an Ideology for Change in Science Fiction
Abstract:
My paper focuses on religion as an ideology that allows for change within science fiction literature, examining religion in Frank Herbert’s Dune trilogy and Octavia Butler’s Parable series. Both authors show the ideological system as disruptive, yet when mapped onto classifications of ideology, distinctions appear. Dune’s religion upholds the pre-existing structures of empire, becoming incorporated into the dominant ideology and culture. Contrariwise, Earthseed, a religion created by Butler’s protagonist, resists the political conservatism and the fundamentalist Christianity of Butler’s dystopian Earth. Rather than perpetuating the structures of society, as in Dune, religion here allows for the creation of alternative structures.
Students:
Dina Truncali, Graduate, Public Administration
Faculty:
George Homsy, Assistant Professor, Public Administration


Investigating the function of cis-regulatory elements in mammalian 3'UTRs
Abstract:
Mauricio Paramo,1,2 Rene Geissler,1 and Andrew Grimson1 1Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902, USA The recurrence of post-transcriptional dysfunction in cancers and other genetic disorders makes gene regulation at the RNA level a central area of investigation. Post-transcriptional control is driven by cis-acting regulatory sequences preferentially located within the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of mammalian messenger RNA (mRNA). These sequences recruit trans factors, such as noncoding RNAs (e.g. microRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins, that affect mRNA processing, stability, localization, and translation. Recent comparative genomic studies and high-throughput cell-based screens have identified hundreds of novel cis-regulatory elements, but the mechanisms through which these elements influence gene expression remain unknown. Here, we focused on the characterization of a subset of sequence elements that activate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We selected candidate activating sequence elements that lead to increased reporter levels without significantly increasing levels of mRNA. To focus on elements most likely to possess biological significance, we furthermore required that our candidate elements be evolutionarily conserved in mammalian 3'UTRs. We validated the post-transcriptional activating potential of each candidate element using both transient and integrated reporter constructs in A549 and HEK293 human cell lines, respectively. The results of our work will help elucidate how multiple activating post-transcriptional cis-regulatory elements influence gene expression, thus expanding the set of known sequence elements that play important roles in influencing mammalian gene expression.
Students:
Eunchong Sarah Lim, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
William Spangler, Associate Professor of Management, School of Management: Center for Leadership Studies


Inducible pesticide tolerance in Daphnia pulex influenced by resource availability
Abstract:
Pesticides are a challenge for aquatic systems. Aquatic species are relatively sensitive to pesticides, but can respond through evolving constitutive tolerance or induced tolerance via phenotypic plasticity. Contemporary literature predicts that tolerance depends on resource availability. Using the zooplankton Daphnia pulex we investigated how resource availability influenced D. pulex tolerance to carbaryl, a common pesticide. We found that individuals reared in high resource environments had a higher baseline tolerance than those reared in low resource environments. However, through exposure to sublethal concentration of carbaryl, D. pulex could induce similar levels of tolerance to those individuals in high resource environments.
Students:
Rupinder Kaur, Senior, Biology
Jessica Yuk, Junior, Biology
Faculty:
Susan Simpson-Seibold, Dr. PhD, MPH, APHN-BC, RN, FNP, Nursing


Building Sustainable Chronic Care in a Free Clinic
Abstract:
Chronic disease/illness management has become a key public health issue in the 21st century. Chronic diseases costs the US economy billions of dollars annually. The poor, persons of color, and those from marginalized social groups, have much poorer health outcomes from their chronic health problems. Free clinics serve as a safety net for the uninsured but frequently operate on a walk-in basis. The Chronic Care Model is effective in managing and preventing chronic disease but is infrequently utilized in free clinics. This project addresses the feasibility of enacting long term chronic care in a volunteer-run free clinic.
Students:
Sidney Guterman, Junior, Mechanical Engineering
Faculty:
David Klotzkin, Dr., Electrical Engineering


Strain-induced Mott Transition in Vanadium Dioxide
Abstract:
A Mott insulator is a material that theoretically should act as a conductor, but experimentally acts as an insulator at low temperatures. A Mott insulator can become a conductor (a change called a Mott transition) by varying some of its parameters, such as strain. By using slave spin formalism, our goal was to show that the interaction between electrons in strained VO2 can be understood using a model of orbital selective Mott transition (OSMT). We show that an OSMT can be obtained using strained engineering of correlated electron systems. Applications of Mott insulators include high temperature superconductivity.
Students:
Jennifer Swaine, Junior, Nursing
Lauren Stiles, Junior, Nursing
Sarah Ryszka, Junior, Anthrology
Megan Eiche, Junior, Nursing
Letitia Chang, Junior, Nursing
Danielle Gerome, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Nicole Caridi, Senior, Nursing
Amanda Gershowitz, Junior, Nursing
Luis Ferreira, Junior, Nursing
Jm Bryan Claveria, Junior, Nursing
Danielle Kiczales, Senior, Nursing
Joshua Segovia, Senior, Nursing
Marlee Voter, Junior, Nursing
Courtney Cronin, Junior, Nursing
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, Assistant Professor, Nursing
Fran Srnka-Debnar, Clinical Associate Professor, Nursing


Biochemical and physiological analyses of Drosophila fat body and heart during over-nutrition
Abstract:
Diets high in carbohydrates are associated with metabolic diseases.  Using Drosophila, the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders can be studied. We hypothesize that lipid storage in the fly adipose or fat body reaches a maximum capacity, resulting in the accumulation of toxic lipids in other tissues, or lipotoxicity.  Triglycerides are reduced when lipogenic enzymes or transcription factors are knocked down in fat body. Assays of heart function and mass spectrometry are being used in these genotypes to identify the contributory lipid metabolic pathways and lipotoxins.  Our goal is to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms and targets involved in metabolic disease.
Students:
Christian Lawlor, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Brandon Gibb, Professor of Psychology & Director of Clinical Training, Psychology


The Friendzone: An Infinite Place Where Nothing Good Happens; A Comprehensive Study of Friendzoning Across Varying Genders and Sexual Orientations
Abstract:
Friendzone is a popular culture term used to describe a friendship where one member in a friend dyad desires a romantic or sexual relationship and the other member does not. Sexual Script Theory (Simon and Gagnon, 2003) and Sexual Strategies Theory (Buss and Schmidt, 1993) suggest that individuals of different genders and sexualites might follow differing scripts for friend-zone choices. College students completed a survey on their friend-zone and hook up experiences. Implications are discussed concerning the variance in friendzone experiences based on sexual orientation.
Students:
Jessica Wasserman, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Fannie Chen, Senior, Psychology ABA Track
Faculty:
Ralph Miller, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Psychology
Cody Polack, Graduate Student, Psychology


Role of dietary sugar on atrazine responsiveness during development in Drosophila melanogaster
Abstract:
Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide in the United States. Atrazine accelerates development in Drosophila melanogaster and we have identified several metabolic genes that appear to influence responsiveness to atrazine. Here we test whether dietary sugar affects responsiveness to atrazine. Flies were reared on either a standard diet or a 10% sugar diet with or without 2 ppm atrazine and assessed for development. Atrazine exposure had a greater effect on pupation rate, proportion emerged and development rate in flies reared on a high sugar diet suggesting that a low sugar diet may mitigate the effects of environmental toxicants.
Students:
Mary McGahay, Senior, Physics
Haian Qiu, Graduate, Physics
Jong Hyun Shim, Graduate, Mechanical Engineering
Steven Button, Graduate, Physics
Faculty:
Junghyun Cho, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Jeffrey Mativetsky, Assistant Professor, Physics


The effect of urbanization on litter decomposition and colonization by aquatic insects in submerged litter bags in Greater Binghamton streams
Abstract:
Urbanization can be detrimental to aquatic ecosystems. We were interested in the effects that urbanization has on streams in Greater Binghamton. Streams in the northeast US are important for the decomposition of autumn shed leaves. We compared litter decomposition and colonization by aquatic insects in submerged litter bags in urban and rural sites in two local streams. We postulated that leaves in urban sites will be colonized by fewer invertebrate taxa and will have lower leaf decomposition rates. We hope to elucidate the relationship between urbanization in the Greater Binghamton area and this ecosystem function in those streams.
Students:
Gabrielle Sagesse, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Laura Musselman, PhD, Principle Investigator, Assistant Professor, Biology


The Effects of Tier Talks on Negative Perspectives in Regards to Level of Excitement
Abstract:
Motivational speakers of any discipline have the goal of profoundly impacting their audience. Numerous studies have been conducted on the effect of inspirational talks on attendees. However, little research has been conducted on the impact of initial individual mindsets going into a TIER Talk and how those mindsets impact the effectiveness of the speech. Data from a survey of 71 individuals showed their emotions before and after the TIER Talk and their overall change in each emotion. Correlation shows that the relationship between all of the negative emotions and the change in excitement is negative, displaying a smaller overall change.
Students:
Dana Kuster, Sophomore, Human Development
Nicole Senderovich, Sophomore, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Richard Kauffman , Dr. , Decker School of Nursing
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Dr., Decker School of Nursing


Knowledge Level on Menstrual Hygiene among Adolescents Girls in Rakai District, Uganda
Abstract:
There is limited research on knowledge about menstrual hygiene among adolescents’ girls in Rakai District of Uganda. This study assessed the knowledge level among girls who participated in girls’ training workshops. 244 consenting participants completed a 10-item knowledge survey about menstrual hygiene. Most participants were 14 to 16 years old (73%). While many reported that menstruation is not a disease (74%), and can cause pain (92%), most answered that pregnant women can menstruate (91%), and menstrual blood comes from the stomach where food is digested (72%). Average number of correct answers was 2.44. Health education on menstrual hygiene is needed.
Students:
Kathy Benhamou, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Steven Jay Lynn, Ph.D. , Psychology


Ecological Impacts on the Spread of Lyme Disease in built versus non-built environements
Abstract:
As Lyme disease continues to spread, biomedical research examines how ecological processes alter disease development. The bacteria that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is transmitted to humans by Ixodes scapularis ticks, infected by feeding on Peromyscus leucopus mice. This project seeks to determine ecological factors that impact Lyme disease risk in built versus non-built environments on Binghamton University campus. White-footed mice and ticks were collected along popular walkways in built and non-built environments. Results showed that both density and infectivity is higher in built environments. Data suggest that built environments pose greater risk for disease transmission, requiring new prevention strategies.
Students:
Jared Gatto, Graduate, Cell and Molecular Biology
Faculty:
Laura Musselman, Assistant Professor, Biology


The Effect on Expertise by Presence of a Superior
Abstract:
In every field, there are many experts that have extensive knowledge in a particular field and colleagues who usually don't have as much knowledge of the topic they are studying. The goal of this study is to determine if the presence of a supervisor influences others to deepen their expertise. Results showed that the inspiration levels of a supervisor did in fact positively influence actions to try to deepen expertise of employees and or subordinates.
Students:
Jared Gatto, Senior, B.S. Biology, B.A. History
Faculty:
Laura Musselman, Dr. , Biology


Improved modeling fo the microphone
Abstract:
Most of current MEMS microphones are based on parallel plate capacitors configuration which suffer from dynamical pull-in. Using electrostatic fringing field can eliminate this problem by pushing the diaphragm away from the substrate instead of attracting it. In this research we investigate the possibility of this mechanism for being a new method of sensing in microphones.
Students:
Anlly Palacios , Senior, Sociology
Faculty:
Leslie Gates , Associate Professor, Sociology


Investigating Fitness of Nuclear-Mitochondrial Genome Combinations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Natural Substrates
Abstract:
Nuclear and mitochondrial genes work epistatically to optimize mitochondrial energy production. In nature, selection for optimal mitochondrial energy production should promote coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. In previous studies, interruption of naturally-occurring mitochondrial-nuclear (mt-n) combinations have altered growth rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in laboratory conditions. In this experiment, growth rates of 15 native mt-n yeast combinations will be compared to 210 synthetic mt-n combinations on media simulating natural environments. We hypothesize native mt-n combinations will outperform synthetic combinations due to coevolution maximizing respiration in their native environments. Our findings will provide insight on how ecological conditions promote mt-n coevolution.
Students:
Chris Li, Senior, Sociology
Lucas Sparovich, Junior, Nursing
Oliver Ramirez, Junior, Cell and Molecular Biology
Melanie Gray, Junior, Nursing
Jessica Lliguicota, Junior, Psychology
Shawn Ofurhie, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Alexis Vassilakos, Junior, Biological Sciences
Faculty:
Judith Quaranta, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Fran Srnka-Debnar, Clinical Associate Professor, Decker School of Nursing


The tug-of-war between fast growth and mitochondrial genome integrity in Baker’s yeast.
Abstract:
In eukaryotes, maintaining functional and stable mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is crucial for cellular energy production and proliferation. Using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, I found that mtDNA integrity is strongly influenced by both nuclear, mitochondrial genomes, and the interactions between the two. Interestingly, I also found that the fast-growing strains also exhibit high rates of mtDNA loss in nutrient-rich condition, suggesting metabolic trade-offs in yeast survival strategies. I am currently investigating yeast responses to different levels of sugar availability, aiming to dissect the contribution of environmental factors to yeast’s decision in optimizing growth rate and cellular robustness.
Students:
Kyle Loftus, Junior, Biochemistry
Faculty:
Sozanne Solmaz, Assistant Professor, Chemistry


Moderate Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and its Effect on the Neurokinin-1 Receptor in the Lateral Septum and Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis
Abstract:
Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can cause problems regulating anxiety. While the neurobiology underlying PAE-induced anxiety is poorly understood, the lateral septum (LS) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) are important anxiety regulators. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1Rs) within these brain regions can modulate anxiety. We exposed pregnant rats to air or moderate amounts of vaporized ethanol. Using immunohistochemistry, we quantified NK1R intensity in the LS, dorsal BNST, and ventral BNST of adolescent offspring. Preliminary data show no effects of moderate PAE (mPAE) on NK1R concentration, suggesting that NK1Rs in brain regions associated with anxiety are resistant to mPAE.
Students:
Haley Burdge, Sophomore, Biology & Sociology
Kimberly Lato, Senior, Environmental Science
Jade Johnson, Senior, Biology
Maria Wadowska, Senior, Neuroscience
Andria Kroner, Graduate, Biological Sciences
Faculty:
Anne B Clark, Associate Professor , Biological Sciences
Andria Kroner, Doctoral Candidate , Biological Sciences


Recapitulate Renal Physiology
Abstract:
Billions of dollars and decades of research spent to create new drugs for diseases fail due to toxicity not found by current drug models. One major symptom of many failed drugs is kidney damage. My lab has previously modeled human renal physiology in a multi-channel microfluidic device which mimics glomerulus and proximal kidney tubule function. Recently, CIHP-1 cells have been added to mimic functions of podocytes – an integral part to the kidney. By adding this cell line, we have shown improved in-vivo like characteristics and better modeling capabilities of the device.
Students:
Bradley Matican, Freshman, Accounting
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi , Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Immunohistochemical Analysis of Acetylcholine Neuron Loss in Parkinson's disease
Abstract:
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by loss of dopamine (DA). Acetylcholine (Ach) loss also occurs in PD but is not accounted for in traditional models of the disease. This work evaluated whether Ach loss changed PD symptoms, L-DOPA treatment efficacy, and dyskinesia in rats with DA or DA+Ach lesions. After lesioning and L-DOPA treatment, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate lesion severity and changes in immediate early gene activity correlating to dyskinesia. This novel model could allow for different treatments to be developed leading to further knowledge of how Ach loss affects the symptoms of PD.
Students:
Melissa Bornico, Freshman, Integrative Neuroscience
Caroline Terhaar, Freshman, Chemistry
Andrea Esposito , Freshman, History
Bradley Matican, Freshman, SOM
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and faculty master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Attentional Biases to Threat-Relevant Stimuli: Angry versus Fearful Faces.
Abstract:
Attentional biases to different emotional faces in patients with depression and social phobia have been thoroughly researched. However, little is known about the differences in attention to both angry and fearful faces in the same task. Participants performed computer tasks that recorded both eye tracking data and EEG data. Using a between subjects research design, the participants computer task data was analyzed along with mood questionnaire data that indicated the presence or absence of depressive or anxious symptoms. The researchers predict that participants with anxiety disorder symptoms will attenuate more to angry faces more than to fearful faces.
Students:
Caroline Terhaar, Freshman, Chemistry
Bradley Matican, Freshman, SOM
Andrea Esposito, Freshman, History
Melissa Bornico, Freshman, Undeclared
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


The Modulation of Steady State Visually Evoked Potentials by the Spatial Structure of Input Stimuli
Abstract:
Vision researchers use a wide range of stimuli, including Gabor gratings, spatial noise, and complex scenes, with varying low level properties, like spatial frequency and luminance, to probe the visual system though there has been little comparison between these stimuli. We presented five categories of stimuli with differing spatial structures (white, pink, and Brownian noise, gratings, and natural scenes) at a constant flicker frequency in a steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm. Lower spatial frequency stimuli like the Brownian noise yielded significantly higher inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) as compared to the other categories, while gratings had the lowest.
Students:
Arianna Gorkowitz, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Daniel Friedman, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Caroline Sendek, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Alecia Moser, Graduate, Psychology
Faculty:
Peter Gerhardstein, Dr., Psychology


Sequestration of the Lyme Disease Pathogen in Reservoir Hosts: Implications for Human Symptoms
Abstract:
Lyme disease, if not treated properly, can result in a chronic infection. This study focuses on the sequestration of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme, in white-footed mice, the primary reservoir for Lyme, and whether it can be correlated to human symptoms. Rodents were collected along walkways of high human use, dissected and tested molecularly for B. burgdorferi. Preliminary data suggests 27.8% of organs have B. burgdorferi, with the bladder and liver having the highest infectivity. These data suggest organ infectivity in white-footed mice may be correlated to symptoms in chronic Lyme patients, but more research is needed.
Students:
Dana Kuster, Sophomore, Human Development
Nicole Senderovich, Sophomore, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Richard A Kauffman Jr, Instructor, Evolutionary Studies
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing


Quality of Life Measures in Women with Post Mastectomy Secondary Lymphedema Who Utilized Online Support Forums
Abstract:
Lymphedema is a chronic condition caused from an abnormal accumulation of protein rich extracellular fluids as a result of impaired lymphatic flow. Causes of lymphedema are usually surgical removal of lymphatic tissue, infection, or trauma. Since the transport capacity is compromised, swelling then occurs in the subcutaneous tissues compartments. Development of lymphedema subsequent to breast cancer surgery is a dreaded but common treatment complication. Women experiencing lymphedema have a tremendous, life-long, self-care burden that can adversely affect their quality of life. This project intends to measure if online support group participation increases quality of life scores.
Students:
Timothy Crump, Senior, Cell and Molecular Biology
Faculty:
Jeffrey Schertzer, Assistant Professot, Biological Sciences


Low Glycemic Index Diet May Reduce Stress Levels in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of a low glycemic index diet (LGID) on stress scores in individuals with Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). 30 participants completed a Kessler K10+ Psychological Distress Scale at baseline and after completion of a 3-week dietary intervention. Analysis of the K10+ survey scores indicated that the overall mean depression scores decreased significantly from a mean score of 4.15 to 4.60 ( p = 0.012). Our results suggest that a LGID may have improve mood and stress levels in GERD patients.
Students:
Tuc Hiep Minh Nguyen, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Heather Fiumera, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences


Human Risk for Lyme disease in built versus non-built environments
Abstract:
Lyme disease, transmitted through a bite from infected Ixodes scapularis ticks, is estimated to infect 300,000 people annually. This study compares ticks infected with B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme, and human risks in built versus non-built environments. Ticks were collected from areas of Binghamton University campus and tested molecularly. Human risk events were determined through direct observation. 50.8% and 43.4% of ticks tested positive for the spirochete, in built versus non-built, respectively. Overall, number of risk events in built environment was over 10 times that of non-built, suggesting the former may pose a greater risk for Lyme transmission.
Students:
Andrea Esposito, Freshman, History
Caroline Terhaar , Freshman, Chemistry
Melissa Bornico, Freshman, Undeclared
Bradley Matican, Freshman, SOM
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master Department, School of Management


Susceptibility of CG5610 on Male Mating Ability
Abstract:
Atrazine is one of the most used herbicides in the United States. Despite its increased usage, it is a possible toxicant that may affect non-target organisms. Previous research has shown that it has impacted male mating rates in Drosophila Melanogaster. We found a gene on a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor unit, CG5610, which conferred susceptibility to atrazine and mapped this polymorphism. Then we performed an RNA knockdown experiment and are in the processes of analyzing the male mating data. Understanding the mutations associated with atrazine resistance can allow us to learn more about the potential risks of this possible toxicant.
Students:
Marilyn Sombrotto , Sophomore, Psychology
Ayesha Siddiqua , Freshman, Harpur
Mohammad Hussain, Freshman, Biology
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Dietary diversity across a modernization gradient in the South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu
Abstract:
We completed 24-hour dietary recalls with 773 adults on 5 islands in Vanuatu: Futuna (rural), Ambae (rural), Aneityum (rural with tourism), Nguna (rural with urban access), and Efate (urban). Dietary Diversity Scores (DDS) and Food Variety Scores (FVS) were calculated. Highest mean DDS was in Nguna; lowest mean DDS were in Efate and Ambae. Highest mean FVS was in Nguna; lowest mean FVS were in Ambae and Aneityum. Results likely reflect increased food variety as people add purchased foods to traditional local diet, and decreased food diversity as traditional food becomes less accessible and purchased food reliance increases.
Students:
Dakota Desantis, Sophomore, Psychology and Financial Economics
Brina Chu, Senior, Psychology
Sophie Portnoy, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Rebecca Feinman, Junior, Psychology and Human Development
Alyssa Goodman, Freshman, Psychology and Human Development
Sloane Ferenchak, Junior, Psychology
Morgan Cinnamo, Junior, Psychology
Faculty:
Ann Merriwhether, Professor, Psychology and Human Development
Sean Massey, Doctor, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Sue Seibold-Simpson, Doctor, Nursing


Performing genome wide association on a novel recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae population
Abstract:
Natural existing S. cerevisiae populations have strong genotypic and phenotypic stratification. Because of this, mapping genes using genome wide association study is difficult. To facilitate mapping, a recombinant collection has been created in our lab. I hypothesize that linkage disequilibrium has already be broken in this collection. I will test for LD first using the sequence data from a subset of this collection, and map the genetic basis of simple traits such as mating type and auxtrophic markers. Then I will use this population to map the genetic basis of a complex trait: high temperature tolerance.
Students:
Christina Jones, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Susan Simpson, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Richard A Kauffman Jr , Instructor, Evolutionary Studies


Effect of introducing P. aeruginosa into S. aureus biofilms
Abstract:
Mixed-species bacterial biofilms can cause human chronic infections. For example, lung infections occurring in cystic fibrosis patients, where Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are present simultaneously. It is thought that established P. aeruginosa outcompetes S. aureus preventing it from contributing to the infection. Our work suggests differently. In vitro, introduction of P. aeruginosa into S. aureus biofilms, leads to a decrease of S. aureus cell numbers but not an eradication. This suggests that S. aureus is not outcompeted in the newly established dual-species biofilms. Thus, there is a need for a better understanding of cell localization within these biofilms.
Students:
Jocelyn Ao, Freshman, Undeclared
Julie Kunnumpurath, Freshman, Computer Science
Logan Abrams, Junior, Business
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


It Doesn't Hurt to Smile: Objectification and Gender Stereotyping of Women in Film from the 1970s and the 2000s
Abstract:
The present study examines the objectification and gender stereotyping of women in film to show the changes in American attitudes towards women from the 1970s and the 2000s. I formed my hypothesis based on the rhetoric from current events, such as the Summer 2016 Olympics and speeches made by President elect Trump. I concluded that the ways women are treated have worsened over the past 30 years. In order to test this, I chose three sets of original and remake films to examined: Freaky Friday (1976 and 2003), The Heartbreak Kid (1972 and 2007), and Bad News Bear (1976 and 2005). To collect my data, I created a code using the objectification theory and gender stereotyping definition. Each major female character was coded and the results of the code show no clear position on the changes of American attitudes towards women. The data collected from the movies shows both positive and negative change in the rhetoric used towards women. I concluded that more data should be collected with modifications to the methodology in order to discuss the changes in objectification and gender stereotyping of women in film.
Students:
Jocelyn Ao, Freshman, Undeclared
Julie Kunnumpurath, Freshman, Computer Science
Logan Abrams, Junior, Business
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master , School of Management and Dickinson Community


OMV Biogenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Abstract:
In P. aeruginosa, outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in cell signaling and virulence. Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS) stimulates OMV production by intercalating into the outer membrane. We hypothesized PQS is exported before initiating OMV formation. Strains of P. aeruginosa were examined under different growth conditions. Conditions with most PQS export correlated with highest OMV production, and cell associated PQS was confined to the inner membrane. PQS export phenotypes are independent of growth phase and stable throughout culture lifecycle. We conclude poor OMV biogenesis results from PQS export failure to the outer membrane, and exporting ability is growth phase independent.
Students:
Jared A Jaeger, Sophomore, Biology and Environmental Science
Faculty:
Jessica Hua, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences


The Genetic Basis of Adaptively Isolating Traits in Plants
Abstract:
Ecological speciation occurs when a new species forms through divergence over an evolutionary time period. The focus of our research is the genetic basis of adaptive traits within the sister species Mimulus norrissi and Mimulus floribundus, which exhibit differences in dispersal mechanisms. Through our research we are trying to determine whether this difference in dispersal is the result of genomic or environmental factors. To test this we perform RNA isolations to evaluate the gene expression influencing the expressed phenotype and we cultivate the plants across a range of pH levels to evaluate environmental differences.
Students:
Benjamin Mclauchlin, Sophomore, Environmental Science
Faculty:
Jessica Hua, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences


The Effect of Caffeine and Theophylline on Cellular Oxidative Stress
Abstract:
Oxidative Stress is present at high levels in numerous human neurodegenerative diseases, cancers, diabetes, and within the aging processes. Carbonylation is present in cells with high levels of oxidative stress, resulting in the formation of carbonyl groups within these cells. Caffeine, 1,3,7-Trimethylpurine-2,6-dione, is a methylxanthine used internationally and is routinely present, usually associated with the delivery of a temporary increase in energy, as it is a stimulant. Theophylline is also a methylxanthine. It can be metabolized from caffeine via N-demethylation. Live cell detection of oxidative stress induced by caffeine and theophylline was performed in this investigation.
Students:
Julie Kunnumpurath, Freshman, Computer Science
Jocelyn Ao, Freshman, Computer Science
Logan Abrams, Junior, Business
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Biofilm Outer Membrane Vesicles are Similar to Planktonic Outer Membrane Vesicles in terms of Size Distribution, Predatory Activity, and Biogenesis
Abstract:
The NIH estimates that 80% of chronic bacterial infections involve biofilms. Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) are found in lab-grown and environmental biofilms, and have functions such as virulence, predation, immune system evasion, and horizontal gene transfer. Our lab is investigating how OMVs are made in biofilms, and how their characteristics differ from OMVs made by planktonic (free swimming) bacteria. While previous research suggests there are many differences between biofilm and planktonic OMVs, we found that OMVs isolated from agar plate model biofilms are similar to OMVs produced by planktonic bacteria in terms of size, predatory activity, and mechanism of biogenesis.
Students:
Chelsea Reome, Graduate, Public Administration
Margaret Goodfellow, Graduate, Public Administration
Catherine Henriquez, Graduate, Public Administration
Colin Millone, Graduate, Public Administration
Dai Newman, Graduate, Public Administration
Anjelica Stanko, Graduate, Public Administration
Tinamarie Williams, Graduate, Public Administration
Faculty:
Thomas AP Sinclair, Associate Professor, Public Administration


The Role of Staphylococcus aureus in Onset of Atopic Dermatitis
Abstract:
Atopic Dermatitis (AD), also known as eczema, is a chronic skin disease of unknown origin. The skin of AD patients has a decreased lipid level, and an increased abundance of Staphylococcus aureus, with a detriment of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The goal of this project is to determine the role of bacteria in onset of AD. In this work, monolayers of human epithelial keratinocytes were infected with S. aureus. To mimic AD conditions, medium was supplemented with cytokines. We found that despite the lack of change in bacterial proliferation, an expedited keratinocyte monolayer degradation occurs in AD compared, to normal conditions.
Students:
Jesse Cole, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Marvin Diaz, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology


Nesting vocalizations of the Mariana crow (Corvus kubaryi)
Abstract:
The Mariana crow (Corvus kubaryi) is an endangered species from the island of Rota, near Guam. We are analyzing the social vocalizations of nesting crows to describe these calls for the first time. Sounds will be extracted from videos of nests and measured using sound analysis software. We will characterize variation due to individuals, call type, and gender. The new Captive Rear and Release Program may use the information we gather to design normal auditory experience for young captive-reared crows, and thus increase their success after reintroduction to the wild.
Students:
Yanbing Mao, Graduate, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Faculty:
Ziang Zhang, Assistant PRofessor, Electrical and Computer Engineering


Biofilm dispersion inducer enhances antimicrobial efficacy across a range of applications
Abstract:
Microbial biofilms represent a persistent problem due to their recalcitrance to effective treatment and/or removal. A strategy for overcoming biofilm resistance and controlling biofilm infections lies with manipulation of the biofilm dispersion response. In the current project, we hypothesized that the bacterial cell-to-cell communication biofilm dispersion autoinducer cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA), would be able to enhance the efficacy of silver and polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB)-based antimicrobial dressings in the treatment of biofilms formed by common wound pathogens as well as bromine based solutions for water treatment applications. Examination by microscopy and viable plate count demonstrated increased antimicrobial efficacy.
Students:
Tamilar Abayeva , Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Assistant Professor , Decker School of Nursing
Richard Kauffman Jr , Instructor, Evolutionary Studies


Effects of Zn2+and Ni2+on Glutamate Transport
Abstract:
Glutamate is the principal neurotransmitter within the central nervous system that is responsible for the transmission of many messages for brain functions. Stimulation of the glutamatergic neuron will result in the efflux of glutamate into the extracellular space. Overstimulation results in a steep increase in concentration of extracellular glutamate, leading to excitotoxicity, and a number of neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. Glutamate transporters are assigned to rapidly clear out the effluxed glutamate from the extracellular space. EAAT1 (Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1), a glutamate transporter categorized under the SLC1 (Solute Carrier 1) family, has been shown to have inhibited glutamate efflux in the presence of Zn²+ ions. Nickel, having similar amino acid coordination sites to Zinc, could also potentially reduce efflux within glutamate transporters. At high concentrations, it was found that both Zinc and Nickel ions had a inhibitory effect on transporter activity. Zinc, however, appeared to have a bimodal effect on glutamate efflux, increasing glutamate efflux at lower concentrations.
Students:
Meeti Purani, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience and Sociology
Faculty:
Brandon Gibb, Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training, Psychology


Impact of a Community-Engaged Research Course on Intention to Enroll in Graduate School and Participate in Research
Abstract:
Nursing 499, a community-engaged learning course, focuses on pediatric asthma. Students are immersed in implementing research interventions in the community. This fosters undergraduate students’ interest and confidence in conducting research, and increases civic engagement. Each semester students submit reflection papers. Analysis of 64 reflections revealed that: 90% of the students are more motivated to obtain advanced degrees; 70% want to pursue research; 60% want to continue their work with asthma; 75% saw community/public health as a career option. Attitudes toward research were positively changed. Immersion in research-intensive courses has the potential to increase graduates pursuing advanced research degrees in nursing.
Students:
Maytar Nebel, Freshman, Economics
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Effect of Beta-Lactam Antibiotics on EAAC1 Expression and Glutamate Efflux
Abstract:
L-glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter, vital for normal brain function. However, an excessive level of L-glutamate in the extraneuronal space has excitotoxic effects, and is linked with neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, it is vital that glutamate homeostasis is maintained. SLC1, a class of transmembrane transporters, is responsible for maintaining extracellular glutamate levels. In an effort to mitigate glutamate neurotoxicity, several compounds have been investigated as therapeutics, including ß-lactam antibiotics. Several ß-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin V, amoxicillin, and ceftriaxone, were found to increase expression of GLT1, a transporter in the SLC1 family. To further this research, the effects of several ß-lactam antibiotics (penicillin V, amoxicillin, and ceftriaxone) on EAAC1 expression and activity was tested in C6 glial cells via western blotting and fluorescence based assay, respectively.
Students:
Paul W Woods, Graduate, Biology
Faculty:
Claudia N H Marques, Assistant Professor, Biology


The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Events and Asthma and Asthma Severity in the College Population
Abstract:
Adverse childhood events (ACE) are associated with asthma. This study sought to understand the relationship between ACEs and development of asthma as well as asthma severity among the college population. University students completed the BRFSS ACE Module. Students with asthma completed the Asthma Control Test. N=487 (372 females, 90 males). Asthma was associated with living with someone with mental illness (t[452]=-2.009,p=.045); being forced to have sex (t[454]=-2.458, p=.014). Asthma and asthma severity were associated with living with someone who was incarcerated (t[455]=-1.969,p=.050;t[53]= 3.044,p=.004, respectively). Findings show that specific adverse childhood events have an influence on asthma and asthma severity.
Students:
Ginger Cates, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Richard Mattson, Associate Professor, Clinical Psychology


Sleep Patterns, Mood, and Academic Performance in Relation to Stimulant Use
Abstract:
Introduction: This study aimed to analyze frequency of stimulant use in Binghamton University students and identify potential patterns of stimulant use among sub-groups of students, the type of stimulants used in relation to GPA, and stress response. Methods: The survey was administered through a university listserv, 292 students completed the survey and responses were analyzed using chi-squared tests. Results: High GPA’s are significantly associated with low or no stimulant usage, p=1.05E-101, p=1.99E-28, p=9.38E-45, p=5.88E-98, p=2.64E-09. Conclusion: Stimulant usage among college students is not directly correlated with high GPAs.
Students:
Logan Abrams, Graduate, Accounting
Jocelyn Ao, Graduate, Computer Science
Julie Kunnumpurath, Graduate, Computer Science
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor, School of Management
Kimberl Jaussi, Faculty Master, Dickinson Community
Kimberl Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Mitochondrial DNA Recombination Produces Novel Phenotypes
Abstract:
The mitochondria contains a small organellar genome containing critical genes required for respiration. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae inherits mitochondrial DNA from both parents allowing for the formation of novel haplotypes. We show that the mitochondrial DNA contributes to fitness due to respiratory growth under temperature stress. We demonstrate that recombination can occur frequently between two distinct mitochondrial genomes. The novel haplotypes produced by recombination between mitochondrial genomes can have novel phenotypes distinct from either parent. Recombination in the mitochondrial genome may promote adaptation by generating new combinations of beneficial alleles.
Students:
Logan Abrams, Junior, Accounting
Jocelyn Ao, Freshman, Computer Science
Julie Kunnumpurath, Freshman, Computer Science
Faculty:
Kimberly Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master, School of Management and Dickinson Community


Effects of Temperature on Body Size of Rhagoletis flies in Complex Ecological Covariates
Abstract:
Seasonality is a critical axis of adaptation in nature. Understanding how insects evolve new life cycle timings is important from the perspective of diversification, the emerge of new pest species, and the response of ecological communities to climate change. Here we use a model system for rapid seasonal evolution, Rhagoletis flies, to test for the role of temperature in pre-winter nutrient allocation. The current project analyzes a large data set from a previous experiment, using generalized linear modelling to isolate the effect of larval feeding temperature on final body size in the presence of a number of complex ecological covariates.
Students:
Anne Taylor, Junior, Neuroscience
Jessica Chumsky, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Christopher Bishop, PhD, Psychology


WEIGHT LOSS SUPPLEMENTS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES: USE AND PERCEPTION
Abstract:
Introduction: The purpose of our study was to investigate the use of weight loss supplements (WLS) by Binghamton University students and assess the knowledge of side effects associated with these supplements. Method: A survey was distributed to students at Binghamton University (BU) via social media and campus listservs. Results: 140 completed the questionnaire (100 females and 40 males). 14% of respondents use WLS, however 5.4% combine supplements. Females seem to use more WLS than males. Conclusion WLS use on BU campus is not prevalent. However, there is a knowledge of the side effects seem to be lacking among BU students.
Students:
Zhao Liu, Graduate, Electrical Engineering
Faculty:
Ziang Zhang, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering


ASSESSING NUTRITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE IN BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY HEALTH AND WELLNESS MINORS COMPARED TO THOSE NOT IN THE MINOR
Abstract:
Introduction The purpose of this study is to compare nutritional knowledge and wellness in students who are Health and Wellness minors versus students who are not in the minor. Another goal is to assess if taking more HWS classes leads to a healthier lifestyle and specifically which classes help in engaging in habitual wellness. Methods An anonymous survey was sent through university listervs. A total of 232 completed the survey. 12 were in the HWS minor and 208 non-HWS minor students. Results Students in the HWS minor have greater knowledge of nutrition and wellness, and exhibit a healthier lifestyle approach.
Students:
Patrick DiFlorio, Senior, Psychology
Faculty:
Ann Merriwether, PhD, Instructor, Psychology
Sean Massey, Associate Professor, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing


ASSESSING REASONS FOR INCREASED NUTRITIONAL KNOWLEDGE IN FEMALE DIVISION I ATHLETES VERSUS MALE DIVISION I ATHLETES.
Abstract:
Introduction This study will assess the underlying reasons for females practicing better wellness than men including different stigmas involving social anxiety concerning body type, eating disorders, and stress. Data will be collected through an anonymous survey that identifies demographic information, nutritional knowledge, stress pressures, and wellness. The hypothesis of this study is that women are more likely to exhibit better wellness because of societal expectations regarding their body image and physical appearance. In addition, women are more likely to exhibit better nutritional due to them being more knowledgeable regarding the side effects of poor eating habits. Methods Forty-one division I Athletes from Binghamton University completed an online anonymous survey that identified demographic information and assessed nutritional knowledge, stress pressures, and overall wellness. The questions regarding stress came from Eating Attitudes Test, Perceived Stress Test and Social Physique Anxiety Scale. The questions will then be analyzed through a t-test. Results There were 29 female Binghamton Division I athletes and 12 male division I athletes who completed this survey. Females were observed to have better wellness as compared to men. Male athletes were reported to handle stress better than women. Female athletes reported more concern when questions asked about food intake and reported being more anxious when asked about body image. Research will be further analyzed through a T-test for statistical analysis once the study has ended.
Students:
Jocelyn Solis-Moreira, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Peter Donovick, Dr., Integrative Neuroscience/Psychology


Long Term Memory in Drosophilia melanogaster
Abstract:
Taste allows animals to discern the food nutritive value or toxicity before its consumption. This assessment is hardwired but also modulated by previous experience. Memory can be categorized by its persistence - short term memory (STM) lasting for few hours to long term memory (LTM) lasting for days or years. The LTM-impairment related diseases like Alzheimer’s are one of the most devastating diseases and considerable research is being devoted to eradicate them or ameliorate their symptoms. We've already established STM assay and described the underlying neuronal circuit. Here, we are developing an LTM assay to study the neurons and genes involved, and as a way to test genetic and pharmaceutic treatments of LTM deficits.
Students:
Katie Garrison, Senior, Mechanical Engineering
Sara Riedesel, Sophomore, Industrial Engineering
Faculty:
Michael Elmore, Professor (Dr.), WTSN Engineering Design Division


Analysis of Micro Butterfly Beams
Abstract:
The sensitivity of the butterfly clamped-clamped beams are extremely high due to its unique structure and size. The purpose of this research is to analyze the dynamic motion of the beam and its deflections.
Students:
FARUK BALLIPINAR, Graduate, ECE
Faculty:
ALOK C RASTOGI, PROF, ECE


Sounds Around, Emotions Within: A Creative and Empirical Exploration of Emotional Characteristics in Musical Composition
Abstract:
This project is twofold - 1) A composition project based on attempting to express specific emotions individually within discrete movements of a major compositional work and 2) A study to see the success of the compositional work and the effects of the titles on an individuals perception of the emotional impact of the movements. The final product for the first project (funded by the Harpur College Summer Scholars and Artists Program) includes a full multi-movement classical/contemporary piece for string quartet and piano. It is seven movements and explores the emotions of joy, anger, fear, sadness, and disgust. The preliminary statistical results of the impact on the titles within the second project will be presented.
Students:
Ezra Guttmann, Sophomore, Biological Sciences
Sherry Lam, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Corinne Kiessling, Neuroscience Research Educator, Psychology
Not Applicable, Not Applicable, Not Applicable


The Correlation between Race and Feeling Respected
Abstract:
Today’s society is constantly striving to promote and foster diversity and the feeling of belonging. We take strives to ensure that individuals have resources in order to feel safe and welcome, especially on college campuses. A survey on diversity was distributed to 458 students in a mid-sized public university asking students of different years, races, sexual orientations, and religions how they felt about the way they were treated and their preparedness for the professional environment. Upon further investigation on the feeling of respect in their environment, white students displayed a more positive correlation than non-white students.
Students:
Timothy Hillis, Senior, Psychology
Kenyon Merriwether, Graduate, Biomedical Anthropology
Faculty:
Ann Merriwether, Lecturer in Psychology, Psychology/ Human Development
Sean Massey, Associate Professor , Women, Gender, Sexualities Studies
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Associate Professor, Nursing


The Relation of Sleep Problems and Mood Disorders in Undergraduate Students
Abstract:
Stress, psychological disorders, and medical conditions have a multidirectional relationship with sleep quality in college students (Lund, Reiter, Whiting, & Prichard, 2009). The primary aim of this study is to examine the relation between reported sleep problems and mood disorders in 200 college students by comparing reports of sleep quality and practices on the Sleep Hygiene Practice Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, with the Brief Symptom Inventory. Insight into the relation between reported sleep problems and mood disorders can be utilized in college counseling centers and university-wide metal health education for college students.
Students:
Tara Jackson, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Monteith McCollum, Professor, Cinema


Taste learning memory on fatty acid
Abstract:
One set of gustatory sensory neurons in Drosophila melanogaster is used for detection of nutritionally rich food. Flies sense sugars through them are able to from memory about different sugars but are not able to distinguish their identity. We have previously described a novel taste modality in fruit fly - the taste of fat - as a response to free fatty acids (FAs). This modality shares the same sensory neurons with sugars but utilizing a different biochemical pathway. We therefore asked whether flies are capable to form FA-associated memories, and distinguish them independently from sugar modality.
Students:
Bradley Matican, Freshman, Accounting
Faculty:
Kim Jaussi, Associate Professor and Faculty Master , School of Management and Dickinson Community


The Effects of Diversity in a Classroom Setting
Abstract:
A survey was conducted regarding students’ feelings about diversity in a northeastern business school. One of the questions that students were asked if they have been given the training they need to understand diversity. The reason for this study is to see if students having less issues with their classmates correlates with them having learned more about diversity. A regression was done in order to show that students who learned more about diversity have less problems with their classmates.
Students:
Christian Salazar , Senior, Molecular Biology
Faculty:
Chuan-Jian Zhong, Principal Investigator, Chemistry


Development of a behavioral assay for real-time tracking of multiple freely moving Drosophila flies
Abstract:
The taste system allows animals to determine toxicity or palatability of food. Drosophila melanogaster is useful in exploring the decision making process in selecting the desired food. We designed a multi-array assay with 3D-printed chambers holding individual flies equiped with an overhead camera. Their movement when presented with a choice is analyzed through a custom-made Python/OpenCV program. It tracks fly position and speed, records distance from and dwelling at food sources and calculates preference over time. Using this assay, we will measure the feeding changes caused by starvation, tastants identity and intensity, as well as changes associated with neuronal plasticity.
Students:
Amelia Martin, Sophomore, Biology
Faculty:
Pavel Masek, Assitant Professor, Biology


Concept Analysis of Urinary Incontinence
Abstract:
A concept analysis is presented using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis method to examine the concept of urinary incontinence (UI) in elders. Attributes, history and a proposed definition of the concept of UI will lead a better understanding of the concept. The concept analysis highlights the need for UI to be considered holistically rather in isolation will be key to improving patient outcomes. Staff who work with those individuals with UI must evaluate their own perceptions as well as those of the patient to truly conceptualize the phenomenon of UI.
Students:
Cruz Torres, Sophomore, ENVI
Dan Armstrong, Junior, BIO
Faculty:
James Sobel, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
George Meindl, Research Associate, Biological Sciences


Predictors of Sleep Problems in Undergraduate Students
Abstract:
Sleeping less than 6 hours each night can have detrimental effects on mood and performance in college students (Barnett 2008). This study examines sleep quality and practices of college students and variables that influence sleep quality in college students. Data were collected from 210 participants on measures of perceived level of stress, academic and personal obligations, mood, and sleep practices. The data will be examined to determine the strength and direction of the relationship of the aforementioned factors on sleep quality, which will assist in identifying predictors of sleep problems in college students.
Students:
Ian Chiu, Senior, Nursing
Monica Chappidi, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Tori Pena, Sophomore, Undeclared
Faculty:
Sue Seibold-Simpson, Dr., Nursing
Ann Merriwether , Dr., Psychology
Sean Massey , Dr., Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies


Distribution of High Lead Paint Index In Greater Binghamton
Abstract:
Lead-based paint poses as a significant health risk. In 1978, lead paint was banned in residential domains, however there remains a high number of housing units constructed prior to 1950. In April 2016, Broome County Executive Debbie Preston cited lead paint as a main focus in efforts to combat lead contamination. We will use data from the EPA Office of Environmental Justice and the US census to study distributions of high lead paint indexes, median income, and physical housing characteristics in various census block groups in the Greater Binghamton area. Additionally, we will conduct qualitative research gathered through surveys.
Students:
Rahul Dixit, Graduate, ECE
Joshua Montague, Junior, ECE
Faculty:
David Klotzkin, Associate Professor, ECE


Effect of Parkinson's Disease Lesioning on Handedness in Rat Models
Abstract:
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. Previous research has shown that rats exhibit handedness similar to humans. Prior research in humans has shown that the onset of PD occurs in the dominant hemisphere and the disease progresses bilaterally, however this hasn’t been investigated in rats. This study sought to determine whether handedness should be considered in models. Using behavioral tests pre and post lesioning, it was found that handedness did not affect PD deficits but PD had an effect on paw usage. Further research should determine if this factor should be considered in models of different stages of PD.
Students:
Acacia Smash, Senior, Africana Studies, Pre-Medicine Track
Faculty:
Titilayo Okoror, Professor, Africana Studies


Increased ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein is associated with stress scores reduction
Abstract:
Introduction: The study examined the ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein associated with stress scores reduction. Methods: 30 participants completed a Kessler K10+ Psychological Distress Scale at baseline and after completion of a 3-week low glycemic index diet intervention. Results: A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures with diet intervention and time as independent variables (P < 0.05) suggest that an increased protein to carbohydrate ratio is associated with reduction in K 10 scores. Conclusion: This study suggests that increasing the proportion of protein to carbohydrate in the diet of has positive effects on stress.
Students:
Cassidy Chen, Junior, Electrical Engineering
Raymond Xia, Junior, Computer Engineering
Mark Freithaler, Senior, Electrical Engineering
Prateeksha Das, Graduate, Electrical & Computer Engineering
Faculty:
Professor David Klotzkin , Professor, EECE


A Study of Comorbidities and Nutritional Supplements Strongly Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Abstract:
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract––Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are two primary types of IBD. The purpose of this study was to find potential unestablished associations between comorbidities linked to an inflammatory state, nutritional supplements used to help alleviate inflammation and promote wellbeing, and the psychological toll on patients. A deidentified database of 500 IBD patients built by Binghamton Gastroenterology Associates. We aimed to identify possible associations between nutritional supplements (vitamin D, multivitamins, omega-3, folic acid) and inflammation related to arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension, along with correlations to anxiety and depression.
Students:
Susana Loo-Li , Senior, Nursing
Faculty:
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Are individuals with mental illness more likely to be gun violence perpetrators?, Nursing Department


Self Perception of Drunkenness, Communication of Consent and Coercion
Abstract:
This experiment examined the relationship between perception of drunkenness, consent and coercion. It was hypothesized that communication of consent would mediate the relationship between drunkenness and confidence of consent. ~300 college students participated in a questionnaire. The results did not support the hypothesis. However, the data from the research is still relevant. These findings suggest that over half the sample engages in intimate relations while considering themselves intoxicated, both men and women communicate consent via nonverbal behaviors and over 70% were not extremely confident consent was given. This has strong implications surrounding policies of affirmative consent and sexual assault prevention.
Students:
Thomas Costello, Senior, Psychology and Philosophy
Faculty:
Steven Jay Lynn, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Psychological Clinic, Psychology


Dementia and Informal Female Caregivers’ Stress
Abstract:
Abstract: Taking care of dementia patient can be very stressful to informal caregivers. Caregiver stress is a significant problem associated with serious health consequences such as hypertension, coronary artery diseases, stroke, and early mortality rate. Furthermore, research shows an association between caregivers stress and deterioration in the quality of care provided to the elderly patients as well as increasing the incidence of elderly abuse. The purposes of this study are to explore interventions that facilitate the female caregiver role more competently and effectively in the community, based on Roy Adaptation Model (RAM).
Students:
Emily Van Loan, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience
Arthur , Senior, Natera
Faculty:
Nicole Cameron, Dr, Psychology


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Abstract:
Early prenatal care provides a peak opportunity for education regarding tobacco cessation. Pender’s Health Promotion Model has been used to measure the effects that various constructs have on healthy behavior of people. The purpose of this study was to conduct a literature review exploring the application of Pender’s Health Promotion Model to assist in the design of a study regarding a perinatal tobacco use video intervention. Databases used to conduct the literature search included CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, and Medline. Pender’s Health Promotion Model can serve as a framework that guides the nurse in delivering the message.
Students:
Gaby Cordero, Senior, Integrative Neuroscience; Health and Wellness
Veronica Wang, Sophomore, Integrative Neuroscience; Spanish
Faculty:
Nicole Cameron, Dr., Psychology


Love in the Qur'an
Abstract:
For Muslims, the Qur'an models a set of values that all believers should strive to emulate. It is not surprising, therefore, that love represents one of the most important themes in the holy book of Islam. Despite its recurring nature, love remains an understudied subject in English language scholarship. For that reason, I will analyze a number of words relating to love in Arabic, focusing on their etymology, use in the Qur’an, how these words help to construct the Islamic conception of love, and how the words’ denotation in the Qur’an differs from their modern denotation.
Students:
Rachael Cavallaro, Junior, Psychology and Human Development
Sloane Ferenchak, Senior, Psychology
Sophie Portnoy, Junior, Integrative Neuroscience
Faculty:
Ann Merriwether, Instructor, Psychology and Human Development
Susan Seibold-Simpson, Assistant Professor, Decker School of Nursing
Sean Massey, Associate Professor, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies


Why Do You Sound so Good? Innate Advantages and Disadvantages of Chinese Singers performing American Musical Theater Repetoire
Abstract:
In the past few decades, the techniques and stylings of American Musical Theater have managed to migrate across the planet, taking root in traditionally non-Western societies. While nations tend to struggle with syntactic issues and comprehension of the English language, many master techniques and methods that American singers struggle to grasp well past their formal education. This study, involving a month-long tour of conservatories around China with a company performing two different pieces of musical theater, aimed to uncover the source of these soaring successes through the observation of workshops and collaborative performances.
Students:
Khadijah Boxill, Junior, Psychology/Africana Studies
Faculty:
Patricia Lespinasse, Associate Professor, Africana Studies